How do black holes emit light?

Black Hole Accretion Disc Light Massive Color Picture Artist's Rendition Weekly Show

If there’s one thing everyone knows about black holes, it’s that they give off no light. These behemoths of time and space erase objects from history, swallowing everything in their paths. Yet a few minutes of research will tell you we can detect black holes through their radiation. In fact, black holes are supposedly some of the brightest objects in the universe. Welcome to the bizarre world of astrophysics.

First of all, your science teachers were telling the truth: black holes give off no light. As their namesake implies, these objects have grown so massive not even light can escape their gravity. If a rogue black hole flew between us and the stars, the only way to detect it would be through its gravity. Astrophysicists have shown, however, that most matter in the universe clumps together. Stars live in galaxies, and galaxies move in clusters. Black holes often live at the centers of galaxies or alongside stars throughout them.

Black Hole Accretion Disc Light Massive Color Picture Artist's Rendition Weekly Show

An artist’s rendition of an accretion disc. Scientists have yet to understand why the black hole emits particle streams on polar axes.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Scanning electron microscopes will blow your mind

How do we see things that are really small? Classical microscope technology can let us see all but the tiniest of objects, but some are so minuscule as to evade our eyes. Enter the Scanning Electron Microscope. This marvel of math and engineering fires a stream of electrons and measures the way they bounce off objects. This data reveals the topology of what the electrons hit, producing precise recreations of surfaces. These images give us insight to an alien world on the smallest of scales. Check out the following images of the world beyond our eyes.

Scanning Electron Microscope Cool Insect Tiny Cells Scary Science Weekly Show

A worker ant.

Scanning Electron Microscope Cool Insect Tiny Cells Scary Science Weekly Show

Surgical mesh.

Continue reading

Bunnies: little Hitlers in disguise?

Bunny Cute Baby Picture Rolling Back Weekly Show Evil

One year ago I published my initial study on the coming bunny apocalypse. The culmination of years of work, it proved these balls of fluff are out to get us.  Furthermore, my research correctly predicted the coming Human-Bunny Clash of 2014. These creatures want blood—and that’s just the beginning.

Continue reading

Cool science videos

Stars Space Outer Beautiful Pictures Secrets Colorful Large Magellanic Cloud Star Forming Stellar Nursery Weekly Show Beautiful

Every blogger has his inspiration, and mine has in part come from the amazing science channels on YouTube. To escape the old “wall of text with pictures” habit, here is a sampling of fun videos. Check out each channel for more science awesomeness.

Vsauce

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PEikGKDVsCc Continue reading

Cosmos premiere review: fasten your seatbelts

Cosmos Poster Promo Seth McFarlane Neil deGrasse Tyson Weekly Show

In the 1980, famed astronomer Carl Sagan popularized science with his show Cosmos: A Personal Voyage. His show not only brought science to the masses but fostered a passion for discovery in viewers. Thirty-four years later, astrophysicist Neil deGrasse Tyson is trying to resume Sagan’s mission with his new show Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey.

First things first: in case you don’t know Neil deGrasse Tyson (and you should), he is the Frederick P. Rose Director of the Hayden Planetarium at the Rose Center for Earth and Space as well as a research associate in astrophysics at the American Museum of Natural History. He is the former host of PBS’s educational science program NOVA: Science Now. Known for his intelligence and his wit, Tyson is a regular on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart and The Colbert Report. If anyone can capture Sagan’s spark, it’s Tyson.

Continue reading